Buying a new home is an exciting venture. New home, new you, first person in the home and all that. It can be very exciting but many home buyers think that because it’s a new home it doesn’t need to be inspected. We often think that if it’s brand new it’s bound to be perfect, right? Well, just as in a brand new car is liable to have issues, new homes can as well and that inspection can really be an eye-opener to some.Do New Homes Need Inspections?

Not only should you conduct a final walk-through in a new home, but it should have it’s own non-biased home inspection. If you are customizing the house as you go, you’ll want to make sure the builder or developer is using the correct materials and finished you chose. This is where you need to have items corrected before signing on the dotted line. Perhaps the tile is the wrong color, slightly crooked or the carpet should have gone down the hall instead of stopping at the top of the stairs. All of these little details are pretty obvious to homebuyers that chose the materials but there are things that go far deeper than cosmetics in new homes that a professional home inspector should check out.

>Defects can happen and many new homes come with warranties that guard against such things. Nevertheless, if you don’t know about them, you can’t argue for them. Also, if you have never lived in the home you may not know that you can hear everyone walking above you on the second story, that the pipes knock when you use the washing machine or that the back door rattles when someone closes the front door. While a home inspector may not be able to learn all these issues, they can inspect places that most homeowners will never tread. This includes the crawl space, attic, roof and under sinks for plumbing issues.

Home inspectors will also be able to tell if something was installed improperly or not adequate enough. Most new homes have builder grade materials and appliances but some appliances may not be adequate for the size of the home. One 3,000 sq. ft. home I found had a furnace installed that only was able to heat 1500 sq. ft. This would have cost the homeowner hundreds if not thousands in heating and cooling costs due to improper appliances. Most homeowners won’t realize this until they are calling the electric company wondering why their bill is through the roof.

>You’d be shocked to know what some inspectors have found out there; missing siding, unattached ductwork, broken roof trusses, raised roof shingles and more! These are all things that need to be taken care of before homeowners take residence.

Read More: Top Advice from New Homeowners

Having a building inspection and signing off on a permit is not quite the same as a home inspection designed specifically for the future homeowner. It pays to have this type of inspection, every. single. time….  Don’t neglect it!

Contact my office today to find a home inspector in your area for your new construction home.